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Today's Stichomancy for Claire Forlani

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Tom Sawyer Abroad by Mark Twain:

All hands jumped for the things, and in eight min- utes our things was out and the balloon was ready for America. So we shook hands good-bye, and Tom gave his last orders:

"It's 1O minutes to 2 P.M. now, Mount Sinai time. In 24 hours you'll be home, and it'll be 6 to-mor- row morning, village time. When you strike the village, land a little back of the top of the hill, in the woods, out of sight; then you rush down, Jim, and shove these letters in the post-office, and if you see anybody stirring, pull your slouch down over your face

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Ion by Plato:

Are you not carried out of yourself, and does not your soul in an ecstasy seem to be among the persons or places of which you are speaking, whether they are in Ithaca or in Troy or whatever may be the scene of the poem?

ION: That proof strikes home to me, Socrates. For I must frankly confess that at the tale of pity my eyes are filled with tears, and when I speak of horrors, my hair stands on end and my heart throbs.

SOCRATES: Well, Ion, and what are we to say of a man who at a sacrifice or festival, when he is dressed in holiday attire, and has golden crowns upon his head, of which nobody has robbed him, appears weeping or panic-stricken in the presence of more than twenty thousand friendly faces, when there is no one despoiling or wronging him;--is he in his right mind or is he not?

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift:

in almost as hopeful a condition. They cannot get work, and consequently pine away from want of nourishment, to a degree, that if at any time they are accidentally hired to common labour, they have not strength to perform it, and thus the country and themselves are happily delivered from the evils to come.

I have too long digressed, and therefore shall return to my subject. I think the advantages by the proposal which I have made are obvious and many, as well as of the highest importance.

For first, as I have already observed, it would greatly lessen the number of Papists, with whom we are yearly over-run, being the principal breeders of the nation, as well as our most


A Modest Proposal