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Today's Stichomancy for Famke Janssen

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Rezanov by Gertrude Atherton:

no intention of asking a little California girl to share the honors of one of the most brilliant careers in Europe," she said calmly. "Set your mind at rest. He has paid me no more attention than is due my position as the daughter of the Commandante, and perhaps of La Favorita. If I flirt a little and he flirts in response, that is nothing. Is he not then a man? But he will forget me in a month. The world, his world, is full of pretty girls."

"A week ago you would not have said that," said Sturgis shrewdly. "There has been nothing in your


Rezanov
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from A Horse's Tale by Mark Twain:

and faces; and you can't disguise a person that's done me a kindness so that I won't know him thereafter wherever I find him. I know the art of searching for a trail, and I know the stale track from the fresh. I can keep a trail all by myself, with Buffalo Bill asleep in the saddle; ask him - he will tell you so. Many a time, when he has ridden all night, he has said to me at dawn, "Take the watch, Boy; if the trail freshens, call me." Then he goes to sleep. He knows he can trust me, because I have a reputation. A scout horse that has a reputation does not play with it.

My mother was all American - no alkali-spider about HER, I can tell

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Lucile by Owen Meredith:

Alone with my thoughts, on this starlighted lawn, By an instinct resistless, I felt myself drawn To revisit the memories left in the place Where so lately this evening I look'd in your face. And I find,--you, yourself,--my own dream! "Can there be In this world one thought common to you and to me? If so, . . . I, who deem'd but a moment ago My heart uncompanion'd, save only by woe, Should indeed be more bless'd than I dare to believe-- --Ah, but ONE word, but one from your lips to receive" . . .