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Today's Stichomancy for Hugh Grant

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Pivot of Civilization by Margaret Sanger:

And the gates of this Chapel were shut, And ``Thou shalt not'' writ over the door; So I turned to the Garden of Love That so many sweet flowers bore.

And I saw it was filled with graves, And tombstones where flowers should be; And priests in black gowns were walking their rounds, And binding with briars my joys and desires.

William Blake

Orthodox opposition to Birth Control is formulated in the official protest of the National Council of Catholic Women against the

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from The Talisman by Walter Scott:

legs. This truculent official leant on a sword, the blade of which was nearly four feet and a half in length, while the handle of twenty inches, surrounded by a ring of lead plummets to counterpoise the weight of such a blade, rose considerably above the man's head as he rested his arm upon its hilt, waiting for King Richard's further directions.

On the sudden entrance of the ladies, Richard, who was then lying on his couch with his face towards the entrance, and resting on his elbow as he spoke to his grisly attendant, flung himself hastily, as if displeased and surprised, to the other side, turning his back to the Queen and the females of her train, and

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain:

it, somehow, when there ain't anybody to say I sha'n't go in. I mean to go home."

"Oh, shucks! Baby! You want to see your mother, I reckon."

"Yes, I DO want to see my mother -- and you would, too, if you had one. I ain't any more baby than you are." And Joe snuffled a little.

"Well, we'll let the cry-baby go home to his mother, won't we, Huck? Poor thing -- does it want to see its mother? And so it shall. You like it here, don't you, Huck? We'll stay, won't we?"


The Adventures of Tom Sawyer