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Today's Stichomancy for Jennifer Lopez

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Hunting of the Snark by Lewis Carroll:

"I engage with the Snark--every night after dark-- In a dreamy delirious fight: I serve it with greens in those shadowy scenes, And I use it for striking a light:

"But if ever I meet with a Boojum, that day, In a moment (of this I am sure), I shall softly and suddenly vanish away-- And the notion I cannot endure!"

Fit the fourth

THE HUNTING

The Bellman looked uffish, and wrinkled his brow.


The Hunting of the Snark
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from The Exiles by Honore de Balzac:

for rising, mounting--an instinctive ambition, the perennial revelations of our destiny.

He displayed the whole universe at a glance, and described the nature of God Himself circulating in a full tide from the centre to the extremities, and from the extremities to the centre again. Nature was one and homogeneous. In the most seemingly trivial, as in the most stupendous work, everything obeyed that law; each created object reproduced in little an exact image of that nature--the sap in the plant, the blood in man, the orbits of the planets. He piled proof on proof, always completing his idea by a picture musical with poetry.

And he boldly anticipated every objection. He thundered forth an

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from The Pupil by Henry James:

against announcing to Mr. and Mrs. Moreen with publicity that he shouldn't be able to go on longer without a little money. He was still simple enough to suppose Ulick and Paula and Amy might not know that since his arrival he had only had a hundred and forty francs; and he was magnanimous enough to wish not to compromise their parents in their eyes. Mr. Moreen now listened to him, as he listened to every one and to every thing, like a man of the world, and seemed to appeal to him - though not of course too grossly - to try and be a little more of one himself. Pemberton recognised in fact the importance of the character - from the advantage it gave Mr. Moreen. He was not even confused or embarrassed, whereas the