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Today's Stichomancy for Penelope Cruz

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from A Man of Business by Honore de Balzac:

admire the sideboards filled with curiosities and rarities fit to make a King of Saxony envious--"

"Now for the scene itself," said Desroches, and the deepest silence followed.

" 'Monsieur le Comte,' began Cerizet, 'I have come from a M. Charles Claparon, who used to be a banker--'

" 'Ah! poor devil, and what does he want with me?'

" 'Well, he is at present your creditor for a matter of three thousand two hundred francs, seventy-five centimes, principal, interest, and costs--'

" 'Coutelier's business?' put in Maxime, who knew his affairs as a

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from The Dynamiter by Robert Louis Stevenson and Fanny Van De Grift Stevenson:

air, there slipped into his mind the recollection of a certain entry in Whitcomb Street hard by, where he might perhaps lay down his tragic cargo unremarked. Thither, then, he bent his steps, seeming, as he went, to float above the pavement; and there, in the mouth of the entry, he found a man in a sleeved waistcoat, gravely chewing a straw. He passed him by, and twice patrolled the entry, scouting for the barest chance; but the man had faced about and continued to observe him curiously.

Another hope was gone. M'Guire reissued from the entry, still followed by the wondering eyes of the man in the

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from A treatise on Good Works by Dr. Martin Luther:

would wish the neighbor's just cause to be lost and their unjust cause to prosper. This sin is most frequent when the opponent is a prominent man or an enemy. For a man wants to revenge himself on his enemy: but the ill will of a man of prominence he does not wish to bring upon himself; and then begins the flattering and fawning, or, on the other hand, the withholding of the truth. Here no one is willing to run the risk of disfavor and displeasure, loss and danger for the truth's sake; and so God's Commandment must perish. And this is almost universally the way of the world. He who would keep this Commandment, would have both hands full doing only those good works which concern the tongue.