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Today's Stichomancy for Steven Spielberg

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Macbeth by William Shakespeare:

He ha's borne all things well, and I do thinke, That had he Duncans Sonnes vnder his Key, (As, and't please Heauen he shall not) they should finde What 'twere to kill a Father: So should Fleans. But peace; for from broad words, and cause he fayl'd His presence at the Tyrants Feast, I heare Macduffe liues in disgrace. Sir, can you tell Where he bestowes himselfe? Lord. The Sonnes of Duncane (From whom this Tyrant holds the due of Birth) Liues in the English Court, and is receyu'd


Macbeth
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from The Wheels of Chance by H. G. Wells:

with you ladies--and always was. You'll be wearing 'em yourself before a couple of years is out."

"Nice they'd look on my figger," said the barmaid, with a titter. "No--I ain't one of your fashionable sort. Gracious no! I shouldn't feel as if I'd anything on me, not more than if I'd forgot-- Well, there! I'm talking." She put down the glass abruptly. "I dessay I'm old fashioned," she said, and walked humming down the bar.

"Not you," said Mr. Hoopdriver. He waited until he caught her eye, then with his native courtesy smiled, raised his cap, and wished her good evening.

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Damaged Goods by Upton Sinclair:

compromising situation--such as the younger man found himself facing in the matter of Lizette.

The more he thought about it the more nervous and anxious George became. Then it was decided it would be necessary for him to break with the girl, and be "good" until the time of his marriage. Dear little soft-eyed Lizette--he did not dare to face her personally; he could never bear to say good-by, he felt. Instead, he went to the father, who as a man could be expected to understand the situation. George was embarrassed and not a little nervous about it; for although he had never misrepresented his attitude to the family, one could never feel entirely free