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Today's Stichomancy for Carmen Electra

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from This Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald:

Juliennes. The food for one. Hand the rest around." Amory ate little, having seized a chair where he could watch the sea and feel the rock of it. When luncheon was over they sat and smoked quietly. "What's the bill?" Some one scanned it. "Eight twenty-five." "Rotten overcharge. We'll give them two dollars and one for the waiter. Kerry, collect the small change." The waiter approached, and Kerry gravely handed him a dollar, tossed two dollars on the check, and turned away. They sauntered


This Side of Paradise
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Moon-Face and Other Stories by Jack London:

seen, the distant bed of it towering high above their heads. They were rounding the curve, leaning toward the inside, gazing before them at the swift-growing picture. There was no sound of warning. She heard nothing, but even before the horse went down she experienced the feeling that the unison of the two leaping animals was broken. She turned her head, and so quickly that she saw Comanche fall. It was not a stumble nor a trip. He fell as though, abruptly, in midleap, he had died or been struck a stunning blow.

And in that moment she remembered Planchette; it seared her brain as a lightning-flash of all-embracing memory. Her horse was back on its haunches, the weight of her body on the reins; but her head was turned and her eyes were on the falling Comanche. He struck the road-bed squarely, with his legs loose

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from The Secret Agent by Joseph Conrad:

success depends not a little on the way you look at it. But Fate looks at nothing. It has no discretion. He no longer considered it eminently desirable all round to establish publicly the identity of the man who had blown himself up that morning with such horrible completeness. But he was not certain of the view his department would take. A department is to those it employs a complex personality with ideas and even fads of its own. It depends on the loyal devotion of its servants, and the devoted loyalty of trusted servants is associated with a certain amount of affectionate contempt, which keeps it sweet, as it were. By a benevolent provision of Nature no man is a hero to his valet, or else the


The Secret Agent