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Today's Stichomancy for Denise Richards

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Red Inn by Honore de Balzac:

if to her I should propose that she deprive herself of fifteen hundred thousand francs in favor of broken-down old men, or scrofulous paupers, she would turn her back on me and laugh, or her confidential friend would tell her that I'm a crazy jester. If in an ecstasy of love, I should paint to her the charms of a modest life, and a little home on the banks of the Loire; if I were to ask her to sacrifice her Parisian life on the altar of our love, it would be, in the first place, a virtuous lie; in the next, I might only be opening the way to some painful experience; I might lose the heart of a girl who loves society, and balls, and personal adornment, and ME for the time being. Some slim and jaunty officer, with a well-frizzed moustache, who can

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton:

They began, obliquely, by talking about Mrs. Lemuel Struthers.

"It's a pity the Beauforts asked her," Mrs. Archer said gently. "But then Regina always does what he tells her; and BEAUFORT--"

"Certain nuances escape Beaufort," said Mr. Jackson, cautiously inspecting the broiled shad, and wondering for the thousandth time why Mrs. Archer's cook always burnt the roe to a cinder. (Newland, who had long shared his wonder, could always detect it in the older man's expression of melancholy disapproval.)

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Hermione's Little Group of Serious Thinkers by Don Marquis:

on safe ground at last, went on:

"Don't you think she was one of the most inter- esting queens in English history -- Queen Anne? Do you remember the anecdote -- -- ?

But she checked him, frightened again:

"I do not wish to hear it, Mr. Finch," she said.

"But," said Fothergil, "She was a most unex- ceptional Queen -- not like, er -- not like -- well, Cleopatra, you know, or any of those bad ones."

Hermione's mother was silent, but it was appar- ent that she feared the talk was about to veer toward