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Today's Stichomancy for Kelly Hu

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from A Sentimental Journey by Laurence Sterne:

with my wig: 'twas either above or below his art: I had nothing to do but to take one ready made of his own recommendation.

- But I fear, friend! said I, this buckle won't stand. - You may emerge it, replied he, into the ocean, and it will stand. -

What a great scale is every thing upon in this city thought I. - The utmost stretch of an English periwig-maker's ideas could have gone no further than to have "dipped it into a pail of water." - What difference! 'tis like Time to Eternity!

I confess I do hate all cold conceptions, as I do the puny ideas which engender them; and am generally so struck with the great works of nature, that for my own part, if I could help it, I never

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Commentary on the Epistle to the Galatians by Martin Luther:

pages, ordinary octavo (like this), since it is impossible to use the compressed structure of sentences which is characteristic of Latin, and particularly of Luther's Latin. The work had to be condensed. German and English translations are available, but the most acceptable English version, besides laboring under the handicaps of an archaic style, had to be condensed into half its volume in order to accomplish the "streamlining" of the book. Whatever merit the translation now presented to the reader may possess should be written to the credit of Rev. Gerhardt Mahler of Geneva, N.Y., who came to my assistance in a very busy season by making a rough draft of the translation and later preparing a revision of it, which forms the basis of the final draft submitted to the printer. A word should

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Flower Fables by Louisa May Alcott:

over the hills, and they saw her no more.

And now Bud left the old forest far behind her. Golden-Wing bore her swiftly along, and she looked down on the green mountains, and the peasant's cottages, that stood among overshadowing trees; and the earth looked bright, with its broad, blue rivers winding through soft meadows, the singing birds, and flowers, who kept their bright eyes ever on the sky.

And she sang gayly as they floated in the clear air, while her friend kept time with his waving wings, and ever as they went along all grew fairer; and thus they came to Fairy-Land.

As Bud passed through the gates, she no longer wondered that the


Flower Fables