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Today's Stichomancy for Rosie O'Donnell

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from A Sentimental Journey by Laurence Sterne:

out of her head that she had never seen me before. For my own part, I felt the conviction of consanguinity so strongly, that I could not help turning half round to look in her face, and see if I could trace out any thing in it of a family likeness. - Tut! said I, are we not all relations?

When we arrived at the turning up of the Rue de Gueneguault, I stopp'd to bid her adieu for good and all: the girl would thank me again for my company and kindness. - She bid me adieu twice. - I repeated it as often; and so cordial was the parting between us, that had it happened any where else, I'm not sure but I should have signed it with a kiss of charity, as warm and holy as an apostle.

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Several Works by Edgar Allan Poe:

And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor. Eagerly I wished the morrow;--vainly I had sought to borrow From my books surcease of sorrow--sorrow for the lost Lenore-- For the rare and radiant maiden whom the angels name Lenore-- Nameless here for evermore.

And the silken sad uncertain rustling of each purple curtain Thrilled me--filled me with fantastic terrors never felt before; So that now, to still the beating of my heart, I stood repeating "'Tis some visiter entreating entrance at my chamber door-- Some late visiter entreating entrance at my chamber door; This it is and nothing more."

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Rewards and Fairies by Rudyard Kipling:

Philadelphia laughed till she caught her breath again.

'Oh no! Rene's a French prisoner - on parole. That means he's promised not to escape till he has been properly exchanged for an Englishman. He's only a doctor, so I hope they won't think him worth exchanging. My uncle captured him last year in the FERDINAND privateer, off Belle Isle, and he cured my uncle of a r-r-raging toothache. Of course, after that we couldn't let him lie among the common French prisoners at Rye, and so he stays with us. He's of very old family - a Breton, which is nearly next door to being a true Briton, my father says - and he wears his hair clubbed - not powdered. Much more becoming, don't you think?'